Depiction of Satan posters & prints by Corbis

Do we count Darkness from as a depiction of Satan? 'Cause Tim Curry was delicious in that role.
Thomas Stothard (Great Britain, 1755–1834), Satan Summoning His Legions, c. 1790. Oil on canvas. In later centuries, depictions of Satan in art evolved from a wretched beast to a more human figure. “By the 18th century, he’s ennobled, almost looking like an Apollo,” curator Bernard Barryte says.
Depiction of Satan
Albrecht Dürer (Germany, 1471–1528), Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, 1498. Woodcut. In the earlier depictions of Satan, hailing from the 1500s and 1600s, this intrigue with horror is projected onto an image of a beastial, inhuman demon. The spray-painting obscured the pentagram's depiction of Satan as a horned beast and writing that included, Gustave Doré, Depiction of Satan, the central character of John Milton's Paradise Lost cGustave Doré, Depiction of Satan, a central figure in John Milton's Paradise Lost c. 1866
While figures of Jesus and the Saints achieved standard, recognizable forms during the Middle Ages, there was no unified depiction of Satan, despite the fact he was a key figure in Christianity.Write a research paper that discusses the relation ship between the (Depiction of Satan) in three texts: 1-Dante?s
Inferno, 2- John Milton?s Paradise Lost 3- The devil?s Bible ?Codax Gigas.[1] The character of Satan has been explored repeatedly in American films, although neither film nor religion scholars have extensively investigated the topic. This article examines the medieval Christian roots of Satan as seen in American cinema and proposes that the most identifiable difference between the medieval Devil and the Satan shown in American films is his level of power over humanity. Hollywood's Satans echo medieval depictions of Satan in form, appearance, and ways of interacting with humans. Although less frightening, pop culture's view of Satan - even when he is treated humorously - is thus linked through movies to medieval religious beliefs.Write a research paper that discusses the relation ship between the (Depiction of Satan) in three texts: 1-Dante?s
Inferno, 2- John Milton?s Paradise Lost 3- The devil?s Bible ?Codax Gigas.It’s no accident that artistic representations of Satan reached a peak at the same time as the Church did during the thirteenth century. The concept of the Devil was used by the Catholic Church to extend their influence over moral, social and political conduct. Clear distinctions were made between godly and ungodly. Indigenous religions displaced by the Church were branded as the work of Satan, and the fear of Satan was used as a powerful tool for conversion. Then, as the Renaissance approached and Christianity waned as the dominant social and political force, so too did the depictions of Satan and his minions in art.4. The simplicity of Paradise lost
5. The complexity of Dante?s Inferno
6. The depiction of Satan himself ( In the lost paradise Milton represents Satan in a more humanoid way while
Dante represents him in a more monstrous way.)
7. Comment on the opposite trinity in Dante (Lucifer?s 3 faces )
Explain how satan is also represented in every circle through : The sins, Sinners, punishments and the guardians
of every sphere.4. The simplicity of Paradise lost
5. The complexity of Dante?s Inferno
6. The depiction of Satan himself ( In the lost paradise Milton represents Satan in a more humanoid way while
Dante represents him in a more monstrous way.)
7. Comment on the opposite trinity in Dante (Lucifer?s 3 faces )
Explain how satan is also represented in every circle through : The sins, Sinners, punishments and the guardians
of every sphere.Thomas Stothard (Great Britain, 1755–1834), Satan Summoning His Legions, c. 1790. Oil on canvas. In later centuries, depictions of Satan in art evolved from a wretched beast to a more human figure. “By the 18th century, he’s ennobled, almost looking like an Apollo,” curator Bernard Barryte says.