Tricked and Trapped: Human Trafficking in the Middle East

TRICKED AND TRAPPED HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN THE MIDDLE EAST Hélène Harroff-Tavel and Alix Nasri
In summary, this essay has discussed the current international situation regarding human trafficking from the Middle East to Europe. The essay has considered the Libyan background context, issues surrounding the smuggling, the European response, and implications of potential courses of action. A key conclusion that has been reached here is that although it is good that Europe wants to confront the traffickers in the name of the safety of the migrants, this effort clearly needs to be complemented by an effort to develop alternative routes through which the migrants can gain safe passage to Europe without the assistance of the traffickers. Otherwise, the migrants may simply end up being in even more danger than they were in before.
Tricked and Trapped: Human Trafficking in the Middle East, ‎pdf 4.1 MB
Harroff-Tavel, H. & Nasri, A. Tricked and Trapped: Human Trafficking in the Middle East. International Labour Organization, ILO Regional Office for the Arab States: Beirut, Lebanon. (2013) In collaboration with TRICKED AND TRAPPED HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN THE MIDDLE EASTMagazine: Tricked and Trapped: Human Trafficking in the Middle East, ‎pdf 4.1 MBMagazine: Tricked and Trapped: Human Trafficking in the Middle East, ‎pdf 4.1 MB
This video is produced by the ILO project "Improving Labour Migration Governance and Combating Human Trafficking in the Middle East" to give more information about the labour migration and human trafficking.This video is a part of my project about human trafficking in the Middle East. Many people aren't aware that forced labor is a form of labor trafficking which is widespread in this region.The ILO will present the findings of Tricked and Trapped: Human Trafficking in the Middle East to more than 100 participants from twelve Arab countries at a regional conference in Amman on Tuesday and Wednesday (April 9-10). The meeting is expected to further discussions on how to put international anti-trafficking commitments into practice in a region that has one of the highest concentrations of migrant workers in the world.Harroff-Tavel, H. & Nasri, A. Tricked and Trapped: Human Trafficking in the Middle East. International Labour Organization, ILO Regional Office for the Arab States: Beirut, Lebanon. (2013) The report ILO is presenting, ?Tricked and Trapped: Human Trafficking in the Middle East?, was based on more than 650 interviews conducted over a two-year period in Jordan Lebanon, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) about how the workers are ?tricked and trapped? into forced labour and sexual exploitation, and the constraints that prevent them from leaving.One of the major forces driving human trafficking in the Middle East is the large influx of foreign migration. Research conducted in 1996 on the routes of illegal migration, smuggling and trafficking concluded that over the period 1992-97, the majority of illegal migrants to Europe had originated from Iraq, China, Pakistan, India or Africa. The International Organization for Migration (IOM) notes trafficking of women from Ghana to Lebanon, Libya and EU countries, women for domestic service from Central and West Africa to Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, and even voluntary migrations of women from Ethiopia to the Middle East, where working conditions are considered to be virtual slavery. The Middle East is a destination region for men and women trafficked for the purpose of commercial and sexual exploitation. Wealthy Arab men from the Persian Gulf area have been known to rent flats that are ‘furnished with housemaids’ for anywhere from a few hours to a few months. Most of the prostitutes and human trafficking victims tend to be from Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Pakistan. Very few countries in the Middle East are devoid of the commercial sex industry.