[Enter LAERTES and OPHELIA his sister.]

Enter LAERTES and OPHELIA, his sister
Laertes and Ophelia are probably one of my most saccharine ships as well. They’re just so cute and fluffy together. (You know, in tragic ways. LOL.)
Laertes and Ophelia
Before he returns to school, Laertes and Ophelia have a few moments together. It is clear that they love each other and have an open and honest relationship, even though Ophelia later scolds her brother, teasingly, about preaching to her but not following his own advice about things. In this speech, Laertes warns Ophelia about several specific worries he has concerning her relationship with Hamlet, something she readily admits to having. is as true for Laertes and Ophelia as it was for the ” wretched, rash, intruding fool”, their father.Enter LAERTES and OPHELIA LAERTES My necessaries are embark'd: farewell:Laertes and Ophelia - Crossword Clue Answer | Crossword Heaven
In Franco Zeffirelli's (1990), simulations of parts of the Bayeux Tapestry appear in two scenes. In the first scene, Laertes (Nathaniel Parker) when he finds Ophelia (Helena Bonham-Carter) to say goodbye before departing the court (1.3), we hear voices of women singing behind him as he enters a room full of women working on the Tapestry with a loom in the background. The film then cuts to a high angle, medium long shot where Ophelia and other women are emroidering the Bayeux Tapestry. This room has distinctly matriarchal connotations and is something of a utopian counter-world to Claudius's patriarchal court. Laertes quickly pulls her over to a single panel in progress, seen from the reverse side and backlit from a large window to the right. Laertes' entrance quickly diminishes whatever matriarchal alternative the room might be tought ot sustain. When Laertes counsels Ophelia not to believe that Hamlet (Mel Gibson) loves her and so not sleep with him, Ophelia moves left over to the Bayeux Tapestry in progress and into the light. (Laertes is shot in shadow.) For a note on the panel she is touching, . Her mercurial facial expressions, shifting from anger to amusement, along with her fidgety fingering of a flowery (feminine phallic?) shape in the Tapestry register her inability to adapt to the wishes of her father and brother wtih regard to Hamlet and signal the passion that results in her very sexualized madness that follows later in the film. (The flower shape anticipates the flowers she gives away her in mad scene, and the word "Episcopus" (overeer, or Bishop) may also signal the the theme of surveillance disguised as caring in the play and film and the nunnery to which Hamlet tells her get to.) A quick panning shot follows her as she walks abruptly away from the Tapestry, perhaps in an effort to escape the patriarchal feminity associated with it, but her moment in the sun (echoing a similar shot with Hamlet in the previous scene) is quickly crowded by Laertes as he moves into the frame (Gertrude [Glenn Close] similarly moves into the frame with Hamlet). Both are now equally in shadow and light. Compare a similar scene in . Ophelia, daughter of Polonius and love interest of Prince Hamlet, helps her brother Laertes prepare for his impending journey to France. Laertes warns Ophelia against emotional and physical intimacy with Hamlet, urging her to distance herself from him. He fears that her attraction is hopeless because, even if Hamlet’s love is sincere, he can’t choose his wife for political reasons. Ophelia listens to these warnings, but doesn’t necessarily take them to heart. She lightheartedly reminds her brother to practice what he preaches.Ophelia, daughter of Polonius and love interest of Prince Hamlet, helps her brother Laertes prepare for his impending journey to France. Laertes warns Ophelia against emotional and physical intimacy with Hamlet, urging her to distance herself from him. He fears that her attraction is hopeless because, even if Hamlet’s love is sincere, he can’t choose his wife for political reasons. Ophelia listens to these warnings, but doesn’t necessarily take them to heart. She lightheartedly reminds her brother to practice what he preaches.Ophelia, daughter of Polonius and love interest of Prince Hamlet, helps her brother Laertes prepare for his impending journey to France. Laertes warns Ophelia against emotional and physical intimacy with Hamlet, urging her to distance herself from him. He fears that her attraction is hopeless because, even if Hamlet’s love is sincere, he can’t choose his wife for political reasons. Ophelia listens to these warnings, but doesn’t necessarily take them to heart. She lightheartedly reminds her brother to practice what he preaches.