Discover Michele Morano's address history, phone, age & more.

Michele Morano taught English in Oviedo, Spain. Oviedo is part of the setting of Morano’s essay.
Born in Poughkeepsie, New York, Michele Morano decided to become a writer in the eighth grade when she first realized writing – something she loved to do – could be a career. Morano said she didn’t become serious about writing until graduate school at the University of Iowa, where she earned her MFA in nonfiction writing and her Ph.D in English.
Michele Morano, author of “Grammar Lessons: The Subjunctive Mood.” Professor at DePaul University.
Michele Morano is the author of the travel memoir, . Her essays have appeared in many anthologiesand literary journals, including , and . She has received honors andawards for her writing from the Rona Jaffe Foundation, the American Associationof University Women, and the New York Public Library, among others. She isassociate professor of English at DePaul University in Chicago, where shedirects the MA in Writing and Publishing program. Michele Morano taught English in Oviedo, Spain. Oviedo is part of the setting of Morano’s essay.Michelle Morano was arrested about 10 years ago on March 23, 2007 in Essex County, New Jersey.Michelle Morano was arrested about 10 years ago on March 23, 2007 in Essex County, New Jersey.
In the thirteen personal essays in , Michele Morano connects the rules of grammar to the stories we tell to help us understand our worlds. Living and traveling in Spain during a year of teaching English to University students, she learned to translate and interpret her past and present worlds -- to study the surprising moments of communication -- as a way to make sense of language and meaning, longing and memory.Michele Morano, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of English at DePaul University in Chicago, where she directs the graduate program in writing and publishing. Her writing has appeared in many anthologies, including Best American Essays, and she is the author of the travel memoir Grammar Lessons: Translating a Life in Spain. She is currently a Public Voices Faculty Fellow with the OpEd Project.Morano focuses first on her year of living in Oviedo, in the early 1990s, a time spent immersing herself in a new culture and language while working through the relationship she had left behind -- with an emotionally dependent and suicidal man. Next, after subsequent trips to Spain, she explores the ways that travel sparks us to reconsider our personal histories in the context of larger historical legacies. Finally, she turns to the aftereffects of travel, to the constant negotiations involved in retelling and understanding the stories of our lives. Throughout she details one woman's journey through vocabulary and verb tense toward a greater sense of her place in the world.

illustrates the difficulty and delight, humor and humility of living in a new language and of carrying that pivotal experience forward. Michele Morano's beautifully constructed essays reveal the many grammars and many voices that we collect, and learn from, as we travel.Michele Morano is the author of the travel memoir, . Her essays have appeared in anthologies and literary journals such as , and . She has received honors and awards for her writing from the Rona Jaffe Foundation, the Illinois Arts Council, and the American Association of University Women, among others. She is associate professor of English at DePaul University in Chicago.Michele Morano's essays have appeared in journals and anthologies such as Best American Essays, the Georgia Review, the Missouri Review, Ninth Letter, and The Fourth Genre: Contemporary Writers of/on Creative Nonfiction.You have probably come across Michele Morano’s essay collection, , at nonfiction conferences with presenters hailing it as an exemplary form of nonfiction. One of its essays, “The Queimada,” has been published in many anthologies. This contemporary classic illustrates the heights of the travel memoir genre. Read some brief excerpts of her work .