Posts about privatised nuclear family written by C H Thompson

privatised nuclear family/ modified extended family has emerged as a main family form in britain
In The Symmetrical Family (1973), Young and Willmott argue that the main form of family used to be the classic extended family, but the transition to the privatized symmetrical nuclear family of today began I=around 1900.
They argue that the modern family (symmetrical family) has strong bonds between married or cohabiting partners, with the relationship becoming more equal on both parts. Both partners share unpaid domestic work, childcare and decision making and paid employment.
Reasons for the decline of the classic extended family and emergence of the privatised nuclear family.
The privatised nuclear family the modern nuclear family which is a very private institution isolated from extended kin and seen so be very self reliant and home-centred unit, with free time spent within the family doing jobs around the house, leisure time is also mainly spent with the family.
In the privatized nuclear family, family members will often know more and care more about the lives of soap stars and video game characters than they do about the real people who live on their street. The privatized nuclear family has been called by Parsons the ‘Structurally isolated family’ since it has also lost many of its functions and links to other social institutions. 2: The decline of the classic extended family and the emergence of the privatized nuclear familyBy the 1970s, the family structure changed to home-centred and privatised nuclear family.Privatised nuclear family becomes market place for products of Capitalism: ..
Privatised Nuclear Family– is a self contained, self reliant and home centred unit that is seperated and isolated from extended kin neighbours and local community life.The second major change in the family to consider is the view that the privatized nuclear family has become the most common form of family in contemporary society, and the classic extended family has begun to disappear.Privatised nuclear family– is a self-contained , self reliant and home centred family unit that is seperated and isolated from its extended kin, neighbours and local community.Due to changes in the way the world is operated there has been a shift in the way the family operates. In the past it was more common for a family to consist of the nuclear family who would then have a close knit group consisting of friends who each had specialities to help the family exist and socialise there children. However in recent years there has been a decrease in the existance of this type of family and an emergence of the privatised nuclear family.If Freud's analysis of the Oedipus complex is probed further it becomesclear that the privatized nuclear family is the major structural condition. He tells us revealingly that for the child to undergo the extraordinaryexperience of internalizing the father there must be a certain intensityto the relationship between the child and the parent. In fact, heclaims that the reason girls do not develop strong super-egos is becausethey are already castrated and hence cannot experience deep fear at thethreat of the loss. He points to the importance of the degree ofaggression the child must experience before it will internalize the father:The second major change in the family to consider is the view that the privatized nuclear family has become the most common form of family in contemporary society, and the classic extended family has begun to disappear.In The Symmetrical Family (1973), Young and Willmott argue that the main form of family used to be the classic extended family, but the transition to the privatized symmetrical nuclear family of today began I=around 1900.
They argue that the modern family (symmetrical family) has strong bonds between married or cohabiting partners, with the relationship becoming more equal on both parts. Both partners share unpaid domestic work, childcare and decision making and paid employment. While Vogel makes a clear and compelling case for the centrality of social reproduction in understanding women’s oppression, this takes a somewhat abstract view of how labour power is reproduced. She argues that the process of social reproduction does not need to be based in the privatised nuclear family so prevalent under capitalism. She poses alternatives to the family for example, that a labour force can be replenished through immigration or slavery. However these methods still involve labour power being reproduced in a family, even if that family is located thousands of miles away, and if the costs of reproduction in that family are much lower there than at the point of exploitation. Institutions such as prisons or care homes, which carry out some of the same functions of the family, are not serious rivals to the nuclear family, which is the overwhelming site of reproduction of labour power.