sane and insane by DarkTyphlosion100 on deviantART

Ask Sane And Insane Answer 3 by ShadowCat759 on DeviantArt
The inferences to be made from these matters are quite simple. Much as Zigler and Phillips have demonstrated that there is enormous overlap in the symptoms presented by patients who have been variously diagnosed [16], so there is enormous overlap in the behaviors of the sane and the insane. The sane are not "sane" all of the time. We lose our tempers "for no good reason." We are occasionally depressed or anxious, again for no good reason. And we may find it difficult to get along with one or another person -- again for no reason that we can specify. Similarly, the insane are not always insane. Indeed, it was the impression of the pseudopatients while living with them that they were sane for long periods of time -- that the bizarre behaviors upon which their diagnoses were allegedly predicated constituted only a small fraction of their total behavior. If it makes no sense to label ourselves permanently depressed on the basis of an occasional depression, then it takes better evidence than is presently available to label all patients insane or schizophrenic on the basis of bizarre behaviors or cognitions. It seems more useful, as Mischel [17] has pointed out, to limit our discussions to behaviors, the stimuli that provoke them, and their correlates.
Sane and the Insane, is IN and yet within this world, the Sane have
Even today, there are many different models of mental illness, none of which are perfect or upon which are universally agreed. The line between sane and insane is a fine one, and a simple label can make all the difference via the expectancy bias. Different cultures tolerate what many would consider insane behaviors based on cultural or religious norms. Sometimes, this "helping" people get better is more about trying to change those who are just different from us. Sane and Insane by ShadowCat759 on deviantARTStudy and the Fine Line Between Sane and Insane | Goddess of Hellfiresane and insane. short film 2013
Where there is an issue of both sane and insane automatism, the jury must be directed to determine, firstly, whether the accused’s act was voluntary on the assumption that he or she was not mentally ill. It is only if this issue is determined adversely to the accused that the onus passes to him or her to establish mental illness: [1979] 2 NSWLR 1; (1985) 20 A Crim R 388. One observation was that normal behaviour shown in the pseudo-patients was interpreted as a part of their perceived illness. The nursing records for three pseudo-patients labelled their writing as a factor of their pathological behaviour. Rosenhan noted here that there is a big overlap between sane and insane behaviour. Every person on earth must feel depressed at times, or maybe moody or angry or tearful on other days. However, in the setting of a psychiatric hospital, these everyday human emotions and behaviours were interpreted as a result of having a mental illness. Another example of this biased interpretation can be seen in an incident at a psychiatric hospital where a psychiatrist pointed to a group of patients waiting outside the cafeteria half an hour before the official lunchtime. This psychiatrist suggested that this behaviour was characteristic of an oral-acquisitive syndrome. A more likely explanation, however, is that the patients were probably just bored and had nothing else to look forward to.One observation was that normal behaviour shown in the pseudo-patients was interpreted as a part of their perceived illness. The nursing records for three pseudo-patients labelled their writing as a factor of their pathological behaviour. Rosenhan noted here that there is a big overlap between sane and insane behaviour. Every person on earth must feel depressed at times, or maybe moody or angry or tearful on other days. However, in the setting of a psychiatric hospital, these everyday human emotions and behaviours were interpreted as a result of having a mental illness. Another example of this biased interpretation can be seen in an incident at a psychiatric hospital where a psychiatrist pointed to a group of patients waiting outside the cafeteria half an hour before the official lunchtime. This psychiatrist suggested that this behaviour was characteristic of an oral-acquisitive syndrome. A more likely explanation, however, is that the patients were probably just bored and had nothing else to look forward to.