A short account of the destruction of the indies essay help

BARTHOLOMEW DE LAS CASAS– A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE DESTRUCTION OF THE INDIES.
"A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies," published in 1552 by the Spanish Dominican priest Bartolomé de las Casas, lays bare the Spanish cruelties in America. Though generally condemned as slander in Spain, "A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies" rapidly became popular in the rest of Europe, where it served to fuel anti-Spanish hate. Spain's enemies used it to depict Spaniards as evil tyrants and to rationalize carving out their own empires in the Americas. New editions of "A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies" appeared repeatedly, even as late as 1898, during the Spanish-American War. While much of what Bartolomé de las Casas said is undoubtedly true, not all historians take "A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies" as the gospel truth. Though sometimes exaggerated, Las Casas' account sheds valuable light on the "Spanish Black Legend." Bartolome de las Casas, who was struck by the inhumane ways in which the native peoples were treated by the European explorers and conquerors, went on to be a leading opponent of slavery, torture, and genocide of the Native Americans by the Spanish colonists. "A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies" includes chapters covering Spanish treatment of Native Americans in Cuba, Nicaragua, Hispaniola, Guatemala, Venezuela, Florida, and many other areas conquered by the Spaniards. Though short (as the name implies), "A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies" reveals a dark but important episode in the history of Spain and America.
Be the first to ask a question about A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies
Bartolome de Las Casas was the first and fiercest critic of Spanish colonialism in the New World. An early traveller to the Americas who sailed on one of Columbus' voyages, Las Casas was so horrified by the wholesale massacre he witnessed that he dedicated his life to protecting the Indian community. He wrote "A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies" in 1542, a shocking catalogue of mass slaughter, torture and slavery, which showed that the evangelizing vision of Columbus had descended under later conquistadors into genocide. Dedicated to Philip II to alert the Castilian Crown to these atrocities and demand that the Indians be entitled to the basic rights of humankind, this passionate work of documentary vividness outraged Europe and contributed to the idea of the Spanish 'Black Legend' that would last for centuries. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: . Be the first to ask a question about A Short Account of the Destruction of the IndiesBe the first to ask a question about A Short Account of the Destruction of the IndiesA Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies by Bartolomé de las Casas - Lots of great info on Taino indians.
Bartolome de Las Casas was the first and fiercest critic of Spanish colonialism in the New World. An early traveller to the Americas who sailed on one of Columbus' voyages, Las Casas was so horrified by the wholesale massacre he witnessed that he dedicated his life to protecting the Indian community. He wrote "A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies" in 1542, a shocking catalogue of mass slaughter, torture and slavery, which showed that the evangelizing vision of Columbus had descended under later conquistadors into genocide. Dedicated to Philip II to alert the Castilian Crown to these atrocities and demand that the Indians be entitled to the basic rights of humankind, this passionate work of documentary vividness outraged Europe and contributed to the idea of the Spanish 'Black Legend' that would last for centuries.A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies (Spanish: Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias) is an account written by the Spanish Dominican friar Bartolomé de las Casas in 1542 (published in 1552) about the mistreatment of the indigenous peoples of the Americas in colonial times and sent to then Prince Philip II of Spain. One of the stated purposes for writing the account is his fear of Spain coming under divine punishment and his concern for the souls of the Native Peoples. The account is one of the first attempts by a Spanish writer of the colonial era to depict examples of unfair treatment that indigenous people endured in the early stages of the Spanish conquest of the Greater Antilles, particularly the island of Hispaniola. Las Casas's point of view can be described as being heavily against some of the Spanish methods of colonization, which, as he describes, have inflicted a great loss on the indigenous occupants of the islands. (Summary by Wikipedia)Illustration from “A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies” written by Bartolomé de las Casas (written in 1542; published in 1552). Illustration by Theodor de Bry. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)The Cruelties of the Spaniards Committed in America

Free mp3 Download:

(Public Domain)

A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies (Spanish: Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias) is an account written by the Spanish Dominican friar Bartolomé de las Casas in 1542 (published in 1552) about the mistreatment of the indigenous peoples of the Americas in colonial times and sent to then Prince Philip II of Spain. One of the stated purposes for writing the account is his fear of Spain coming under divine punishment and his concern for the souls of the Native Peoples. The account is one of the first attempts by a Spanish writer of the colonial era to depict examples of unfair treatment that indigenous people endured in the early stages of the Spanish conquest of the Greater Antilles, particularly the island of Hispaniola. Las Casas's point of view can be described as being heavily against some of the Spanish methods of colonization, which, as he describes, have inflicted a great loss on the indigenous occupants of the islands. (Summary by Wikipedia)

00 - The Argument of this Narrative by way of Preface to the Reader --
01 - The Cruelties of the Spaniards Committed in America --
02 - Of the Island Hispaniola --
03 - Of the Kingdoms contained in Hispaniola --
04 - Of the Isles of St. John and Jamaica --
05 - Of the Isle of Cuba --
06 - Of the Continent --
07 - Of the Province of Nicaraqua --
08 - Of New Spain --
09 - Of New Spain in Particular --
10 - Of the Kingdom and Province of Guatimala --
11 - A Farther Discourse of New Spain: And some Account of Panuco and Xalisco --
12 - Of the Kingdom of Jucatan --
13 - Of the Province of St. Martha & Of the Province of Carthagena --
14 - Of the Pearl-Coast, Paria, and Trinity-Isle --
15 - Of the River Yuya Pari --
16 - Of the Kingdom of Venecuela --
17 - Of the Provinces of Florida --
18 - Of the Plate-River, that is, the Silver-River --
19 - Of the Vast Kingdoms and Spatious Provinces of Perusia --
20 - Of the New Kingdom of Granada --