Known for the Pulitzer-Prize winning novel "To Kill a Mockingbird"

Castleman, Tamara. Cliffsnotes’ Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. New York: Cliffsnotes, 2000.
Berman: To Kill A Mockingbird is a staple in American school classrooms. When you say it’s a “very adult novel,” does that mean it wouldn’t be suitable for schoolchildren to read?
To Kill A Mockingbird is the only published book by her.
Mockingbirds. When Atticus tells the children that it's a sin to kill a mockingbird, he establishes it as a symbol of innocence and, ultimately, of vulnerability, because the mockingbird can't defend itself. Miss Maudie explains that the mockingbird is innocent because it doesn't do anything but make music for people to enjoy. Later, we'll see how Tom Robinson and Boo Radley themselves become the symbolic mockingbirds of the book. compassion in the world. The title of the book, To Kill a Mockingbird is a key“To Kill a Mockingbird” is, unequivocally, one of the great American classics.-Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird
The most important theme of the 1960 Pulitzer Prize winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird is author Harper Lee’s tenacious exploration of the moral nature of people. Lee tenaciously explores the moral nature of human beings, especially the struggle in every human soul between discrimination and tolerance. The novel is very effective in not only revealing prejudice, but in examining the nature of prejudice, how it works, and its consequences. One of the ways it accomplishes this is by dramatizing the main characters’, Scout and Jem’s, maturing transition from a perspective of childhood innocence. Initially, because they have never seen or experienced evil themselves, they assume that all people are good by nature and tolerant of others. It is not until they see things from a more realistic adult perspective that they are able to confront evil, as well as prejudice, and incorporate it into their understanding of the world (Castleman).In conclusion, in To Kill a Mockingbird, author Harper Lee tenaciously explores the moral nature of human beings, especially the struggle in every human soul between discrimination and tolerance. The novel is very effective in not only revealing prejudice, but in examining the nature of prejudice, how it works, and its consequences.As a result of this skillful literary portrayal by Harper Lee of the psychological transition from innocence to experience to realization, To Kill a Mockingbird succeeds admirably in portraying the very real threat that hatred, prejudice, and ignorance have always posed to the innocent. Simple, trusting, good-hearted characters such as Tom Robinson and Boo Radley are tragically unprepared. They are ill-equipped emotionally and psychologically to deal with the unexpected depths of the prejudice they encounter -- and as a result, they are destroyed. Even Jem is victimized to a certain extent by his discovery of the evil of prejudice and its hidden power over so many people during and after the controversial trial (Bergman and ..."Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill a Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior- to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos."To Kill A Mockingbird Prejudice has caused the pain and suffering of others for many centuries. Some examples of this include the Holocaust and slavery in the United States. In to Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee racism was the cause of much agony to the blacks of a segregated South. Along with blacks, other groups of people are judged unfairly just because of their difference from others. The prejudice and bigotry of society causes the victimization of people with differences. Some who are discriminated against are those who are born differently than the majority. One person that is treated unfairly is Calpurnia, as you can see when Aunt Alexandra tried to get Atticus to fire Calpurnia, ...The story of a young girl confronting deep-seated prejudice, it pits a six-year-old Scout Finch and her (relatively) anti-racist family against the segregation of an American South in the grip of . Author drew on her own childhood experience for the events of To Kill a Mockingbird. More than one critic has noticed some similarities between Scout and Lee herself—and between Scout's friend Dill and Lee's own childhood friend, . Like Scout, Lee's father was an attorney who defended black men accused of crimes; like Scout, Lee had a brother four years older.